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SAY BOO TO the Flu

free flu shots at Calpulli through Oct

Free Flu Vaccine

With flu season just around the corner, San Diego State University is launching its annual "Say Boo to the Flu" campaign that includes free flu shots for students at Calpulli Center and at mobile flu clinics around the main campus.

The free flu vaccine is available during October or until supplies run out. The effort is a partnership between Student Health Services in the Division of Student Affairs and the County of San Diego.

The five scheduled mobile flu clinics will be staffed by employees from Student Health Services and nursing students. Free flu shots and free hand-sanitizing wipes will be available for SDSU students.

Dates for the mobile flu clinics:

  • Oct. 4, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., flagpole in front of Hepner Hall
  • Oct. 9, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Aztec Recreation Center
  • Oct. 17, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Tula Community Center
  • Oct. 25, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Love Library
  • Oct. 31, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Lee and Frank Goldberg Courtyard, Conrad Prebys Aztec Student Union

Last year, over 1,200 students were vaccinated, and SHS anticipates higher demand this year. Students can make an appointment at Calpulli or visit one of the mobile flu clinics while supplies last. Go to https://healtheconnect.sdsu.edu or call 619-594-4325 to make an appointment.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said last week that flu killed 80,000 Americans last year and sent 900,000 to the hospital - the deadliest influenza season in years.

Student Health Services Director Darrell Hess urged students to get vaccinated, not only to prevent illness that interferes with academics and other activities but also to prevent spreading illness to others.

"When you get a flu vaccine, you may also protect people around you, including those who are more vulnerable to serious flu illness," he said. "And flu vaccination has also been shown in several studies to reduce the severity of illness in people who get vaccinated but still get sick."