Wednesday, October 18, 2017

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Randy Phillip discussed his research at a recent Discovery Slam hosted by the Division of Research and Graduate Affairs. Randy Phillip discussed his research at a recent Discovery Slam hosted by the Division of Research and Graduate Affairs.
 


Randy Philipp Leads National Mathematics Educators

Veteran researcher is a thought leader in his discipline.
By SDSU News Team
 

Randolph Philipp, a professor in San Diego State University’s College of Education, is the president–elect of the nation’s largest professional association of mathematics teacher educators.

“Randy’s election acknowledges his influence as a highly respected researcher, educator and thought leader in his discipline,” said Joseph Johnson, College of Education dean.

A 25-year veteran of SDSU, Philipp is director of the Center for Research in Mathematics and Science Education (CRMSE), where he helps to oversee a portfolio of multi-million dollar grants.

CRMSE is an interdisciplinary community of scholars at SDSU engaged in research, curriculum development and dissemination, publications, presentations, and leadership roles in the community.

SDSU’s national influence

The organization for which Philipp is president–elect—the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (ATME)—has been profoundly shaped by SDSU researchers. Nadine Bezuk, also a professor in SDSU’s College of Education, was executive director of AMTE for 13 years. In 2011, the association renamed one of its annual awards as the Nadine Bezuk Leadership and Service Award.

In a recent interview, Philipp described his role within CRMSE and the SDSU’s School of Teacher Education.

“Within my profession, people don’t really understand what a mathematics educator is. I know a lot of mathematics, but I don’t research mathematics. Instead, I research how people think about mathematics, how people learn mathematics, and how they teach mathematics.”

Philipp also serves as co-principal investigator for a 5-year National Science Foundation Noyce Mathematics and Science Master Teaching Fellowship funded to support and investigate the work of 32 secondary school mathematics and science master-teacher fellows on their journey to becoming more accomplished teachers and teacher leaders.